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Erika Lindland November 18, 2011 TWEET COMMENTS 0

Balancing Act - Page 2

 

1. Pre-requisite: Single Leg Balance on Stable Surface (floor)

Begin by balancing on one leg on a stable surface. Your hips should be level, torso upright and arms hanging naturally at your sides. Standing in front of a mirror is ideal so you can see what your body is doing. Try to hold for 30 to 60 seconds. Switch sides.

Make it more challenging: Turn your head from side-to-side, pass a medicine ball around your waist or close your eyes.

2. Single Leg Balance on BOSU

With the flat side down, start by standing with both feet on the BOSU. Once you feel balanced, stand on one leg. Keep your standing leg locked, with your quad engaged and raised leg bent 90 degrees.

Make it more challenging: Turn your head from side to side or pass a medicine ball around your waist, alternating directions. The goal is to be able to do each one of these activities as steady as possible.

Hardest: Perform exercise on flat side of BOSU, with ball side down.

3. Weight Shifting on BOSU

Start with both feet on the ball side of the BOSU, flat side down. Shift your weight forward onto your toes and then back toward your heels, increasing your forward and backward motion without falling.

Make it more challenging: Stand on one leg. Rock back and forth for 30 to 60 seconds on each foot.

Hardest: Perform exercise on flat side of BOSU, with ball side down.

4. Pistols on BOSU

Start by standing on one leg on ball side of the BOSU, with standing leg quad engaged and raised leg extended as close to 90-degrees as your flexibility allows. Bend your standing knee 30 to 45 degrees and then return to standing. As you squat, sit back slightly, like sitting in a chair, to engage your glutes. Perform two to three sets of 15 reps on each side.

Make it more challenging: Try to squat further than 45 degrees or hold a medicine ball while you squat.

Hardest: Perform exercise on flat side of BOSU, with ball side down.

5. Ball Toss on BOSU

Start by standing on one leg on either side of the BOSU. With a partner, toss a ball back and forth for 60 seconds on each leg.

Make it more challenging: Have your partner throw a ball slightly to the side or down low so you are forced to react quickly to catch it. (If you don't have a partner, throw ball against a wall.)

If these exercises seem difficult at first, it just means its even more important for you to be doing stability work.

Erika Lindland is an orthopedic physical therapist in Fairfax, California, and certified strength and conditioning specialist who works primarily with runners. She is also an ultrarunner and the owner of the online trail running store www.MarinTrailRunning.com.



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